Sept. 15 is Power Up at Your Library Day

 Dorcas Hand, Editor of TASL Talks http://tasltalks.blogspot.com/2016/08/september-15-power-up-day-from-tla.html

How to plant and care for tulips

 

Remember all the way back to April when TLA Conference was here in Houston? IdeasPowered as a PR program was unveiled there by outgoing TLA president Susan Mann and the TLA PR and Marketing Committee – check out the video from the event.  It was powerful at conference – the idea wall was amazing! And really, “Ideas Powered – It’s What We Do” is exactly the right slogan for Texas school librarians along with our colleagues in other kinds of libraries.

Now we have Power Up at Your Library Day just around the corner on September 15. Consider how you can use TLA promos in your school community to raise awareness of what your do towards student achievement.

Logos for download 

Posters (7) for download 

Toolkit of ideas 

WHY would you want to do this? All school libraries in Texas work hard every day to demonstrate to campus, district and state leadership all that we contribute to student success: our innovative and collaborative practices that directly impact student learning. We know you are really busy – but we also know that taking a bit of time to promote your program will help to keep your library program strong, or even build support. Take this opportunity to use TLA materials to toot your horn to the community.

  • Invite district administrators and school board to visit. your superintendent and district leadership cannot be reminded too many times how great your school library program is and why every student in your district deserves a strong school library to support their love of learning, love of reading and the skills those bring to their academic achievement. SHOW OFF! You are doing a great job, but they need to know it
  • Even invite your state representative (but ask permission first). Remember, the state legislature will be enacting a new budget in spring 2017 – it is exactly the right time to remind your representatives why they want to support school libraries.
  • Also, ESSA (Federal Elementary Students Succeed Act) is on the table. State leadership is working out how those funds will be allocated across Texas. We need to remind everyone that we are included in ESSA language and should be included in the funding.

 

So Power Up at YOUR Library on September 15. Take the ideas presented and make them your own – or add new ones. And then take lots of pictures – you can use those photos all year round! Share them on Twitter and Facebook. This really does matter – for you, and for all your library colleagues across the state. When we do it all on one day we increase the impact of the information.

Last advice: HAVE FUN! Your students love it when you love it – and that enthusiasm builds bridges with all these decision makers as well. Really, have a great time planning and then enjoy the best Power Up at Your Library Day EVER!

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Guest Blogger: Cynthia Alaniz Librarian in Cute Shoes

 Librarian in Cute Shoes  Follow Cynthia’s blog at http://librarianincuteshoes.blogspot.com/
#TXLA16: A Wonderful Whirlwind   Monday, April 25, 2016
I attended the Texas Library Association’s 2016 Annual Conference, and though I’ve been home for two days, it is still fresh on my mind.  The time was incredibly enriching and filled with so many incredible moments. I took some pictures, but I couldn’t capture everything. You never can.
What makes this conference so amazing? Well-planned and painstakingly organized, the blueprint for this conference is laid out early, with attention to every detail! And the people! All of the dedicated and determined librarians who plan and execute it all make it great for attendees as well as speakers.
I had a tiny part to play in it, mostly through the work of two programs (along with some volunteer work for the Bluebonnet Luncheon):
Donalyn Miller and I shared many title recommendations in “Book Chat Live” — including picture books, graphic novels, early readers, middle grade, nonfiction. We hope we helped librarians spend money on books! We had more books than time! Isn’t this always the case? Most certainly, working with Donalyn was a wonderful experience!
I also moderated a panel of authors in a session appropriately named “Notably Newbery”.
This session will get its own blog post here tomorrow! I hope you will come back to read it!
I couldn’t possible attend everything I wanted to, but through the beauty of Twitter, and conversations in hallways and ballrooms, I was able to learn from sessions I could not attend.
One session I found particularly wonderful was the Poetry Roundup!
There is always a great lineup of poets at this event! And listening to these poets read from their work is truly a wonderful experience! Attending this session always give me great ideas to share poetry with my school.
Dr. Sylvia Vardell is the moderator and poet planner extraordinaire! I attend Poetry Roundup every year!
Newbery winner Kwame Alexander, author of The Crossover, shares a poem for the Poetry Improv with Janet Wong to his left.
This is my first blog post about #txla16. Some conferences just can’t be written about only once! Especially ones held in Texas!!
I hope you will visit again tomorrow to read more!
Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Celebrate Women ‘s History Month 2016 in February and ALL YEAR Round!

Back to School! (38)

 

 

It seems fitting to post about women and their impact on history by opening with a quote from Ronald Reagan’s Proclamation of Women’s History Month, 1987, in light of the recent demise of Mrs. Nancy Reagan, the widow of President Ronald Reagan and passionately devoted keeper of his flame, who died Sunday morning in her Los Angeles home at age 94.   One does not have to be a fan of Reagan politics to appreciate what Mrs. Reagan brought to the office of First Lady and to recognize and respect her unfailing support of her husband.

The first proclamation of Women’s History Month was signed by Ronald Reagan in 1987. Reagan writes, “From earliest times, women have helped shape our Nation. Historians today stress all that women have meant to our national life, but the rest of us too should remember, with pride and gratitude, the achievements of women throughout American history.

Those achievements span the wide range of human endeavor. They have not been attained without the quiet courage and sacrifice of millions of women,some famed, most not. Women have established themselves in business and the professions, and today women outnumber men as undergraduates at our colleges and universities. Women have fought for moral and social reform and have taken part in and led many great social and political movements of our land. Women have founded many of our philanthropic, cultural, educational, and charitable institutions. Women have served our Nation with valor and distinction during wartime, nursing the wounded, piloting airplanes, performing vital jobs in defense plants. Women have forged a place for themselves in public life,serving on the Supreme Court, in the Congress, and in Cabinet posts; becoming Ambassadors; and holding Federal Executive posts that affect the lives of every citizen.”

As we float through the month of March, let’s keep these concepts in our mind and work to honor all women throughot the year.

“Feminism is the ability to choose what you want to do.”  Nancy Reagan

 

Check out the following resources:

http://www.readworks.org/womens-history-month?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=3.3.16%20women

http://www.nwhp.org/womens-history-month/2016-theme/

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month

http://womenshistorymonth.gov/

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Yes, You SHOULD attend TLA Annual Conference – You are Worth It

TXASL logo Originally posted 2/15/2016    http://tasltalks.blogspot.com/

How to plant and care for tulips
By Jennifer LaBoon, Fort Worth ISD Coordinator, Library Technology       

TLA Annual Conference is right around the corner! It’s time to get your travel plans to Houston finalized and get registered for what will be the best conference ever!

A year ago, I wrote about the rationale for why school librarians must make the case to go to conference for the AASL blog.  Of course, in Texas we’re so very fortunate to have aworld class conference right here in our state every year.  We have even more reason to make annual attendance a regular part of our professional development plans.

Even with such an awesome conference nearby, I know many of us have a hard time making the case to attend.  Conferences are expensive, aren’t they?  Why spend that kind of money?

Because school librarians reach every student on our campuses.  We co-teach with, mentor, and model good teaching for other teachers.  We collaborate with librarians in other schools to leverage the learning to multiply the value even more.  We’re expected to recommend well-researched expenditures of campus funds on technology, print, and digital resources.   And even more so, continuing education is an expected part of any profession, and for most of us, our certification credentials require it.

Sadly, some members of our profession seem to feel that this sort of professional learning is a luxury that they can’t afford.   Maybe it’s because as librarians, we’re exceptionally careful with spending.  We are some of the most cautiously creative people I know when it comes to stretching a dollar, and it always seems like there’s less money to go around.  However, I’m here to tell you that you are worth it – and you need it to remain current in your school library skill set.  Demonstrate why before you go, while you are there, and when you return:

BEFORE you make your proposal to your administration about attending a conference, do your homework.  Study the program.  What workshops or speakers align with the goals of your campus?  Which ones will you be sure to attend?  How much will it cost?  What is the dollar amount for you to register and cover your expenses?  What is your district’s/school’s policy on travel and/or professional development?

While you’re there (aka DURING), make good choices about your time.  Author sessions were always so hard for me to pass by at first–I could have spent entire conferences going from author to author.  While those aren’t the meat of the conference, but rather the dessert, I was able to use those experiences with students and teachers to deepen author studies, liven up book talks, and be more knowledgeable with reader’s advisory (I also would get a book autographed for my principal as a thank you).  However, the sessions thatchallenged me with technology trends, pushed my thinking about advocacy, and informed my practice as a collaborative co-teacher were the ones that I made sure to attend.

Visiting vendor/exhibit halls is how you discover new products that can make your job easier or pique student interest in new ways. Make a point to visit the booths of companies selling products you’re in the market to buy – that’s useful research.  While you’re there, pick up posters or giveaways that you can share with your colleagues when you get home.  Sessions are the main course, but the exhibits are an important side option.

Networking is also a huge part of attending a conference.  Ask speakers or session seatmates for their business cards or contact information if they share something that you might need to follow-up on once you’re home.  It’s a huge compliment to a speaker to have someone ask for that information after a session, and a great way to build your network.

Don’t forget to use social media options such as Twitter to capture ideas that resonate with you and show those back home that you’re engaged in active learning.

When you return, (aka AFTER) prepare a quick thank you note (know your administrator’s preferred communication style and use that!) to your principal with three quick highlightsthat demonstrate what you learned.  Propose at least one idea that you can re-deliver to your staff in a short session during a faculty meeting or staff development day.  Then make sure to impress the heck out of those teachers away with what you show them.  Anytime you demonstrate something you learned to students or in front of your colleagues, be sure to mention where you learned it–seems simple, but being purposeful about how you’re paying forward that investment is how you’ll prove it’s worth it to send you back!

It really comes down to valuing yourself and your knowledge and the impact that you have as a collaborative member of your faculty.  Be an example of a good return on investment!

Personally, I can’t put a price tag on the renewal I get professionally from attending conference each year.  It’s what helps push me through to the end of the year, and keeps me thinking about new ways to make the next year of my career the best ever.

Hope to see you in April!

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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February is Library Lover’s Month

 

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Multicultural Children’s Book Day

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Why should you care about multicultural children’s books?  Because you and any children whose lives you touch live in the real world which is multicultural.  It is very important that children see themselves represented on the pages of a children’s book in positive lights for many reasons.

Think about our world today and the images children see in the media about cultures different from their own and reflect  why it might be equally important for children to explore, different cultures from the safe pages of children’s literature!

Resources are readily available!   http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/multicultural-reading-resources/diversity-book-lists-for-kids/

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Monday, January 15, 2016

While I enjoy a 3 day weekend as much as the next person, I am posting these words as a reminder to myself that this day is not just a day off work or a day to sell mattresses or appliances. We reserve the 3rd Monday in January to honor a man who made an undeniable impact on the landscape of America. I love this statement which is truly timeless.

“The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists, who are dedicated to justice, peace, and brotherhood. The trailblazers in human, academic, scientific, and religious freedom have always been nonconformists. In any cause that concerns the progress of mankind, put your faith in the nonconformist!”

-Martin Luther King, Jr.,

civil-rights leader (15 Jan 1929-1968)

 

Martin_Luther_King,_Jr.

king.jpg www.nobelprize.org

 

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Grinchish, Anyone?

Monday's Musings

As I was crawling to work on the typically busy highway with my Grinch safely buckled in the passenger seat, as per my norm during the holiday season, I heard an unfamiliar tinkling sound.  I searched the dashboard and immediate surroundings [remember, I am crawling to work] and realized that my grumpy Grinchish friend was the source of the bell sounds.  What audacity!   Tinkling away with impunity, all the while with the familiar fiendish Grinch grin on his silly sewn face!  I was appalled!  I rely on Grinch to keep me balanced in this season of saccharine syrupy sayings, rampant consumerism, the endless songs, the tinsel, the trappings….

What is the world coming to when the Grinch himself is tinkling his little bell as if angels were getting wings or something?

Bah Humbug!

grinch5

 

 

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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Letters About Literature – Making the Reading/Writing Connection

How to plant and care for tulips

Letters About Literature – Making the Reading/Writing Connection

 by Kate DiPronio, Librarian, Cedar Valley Middle School (RRISD); chair Tall Texans Round Table; Spirit of Texas Middle School Committee; TASL Alt. Councilor.   Originally posted on TASL Talks: Legislative and Advocacy for YOU

“Nobody but a reader ever became a writer. “—Richard Peck.  Type into your search bar ‘reading writing connection’ and you will get thousands of hits.  I can’t think of one author who claims to be a non-reader.   As a teacher librarian I am always looking for ways to connect reading and writing and make it meaningful in my students’ lives while also meeting curricular requirements as outlined in our TEKS.

The Letters About Literature writing contest hosted by the Texas Center for the Book, in affiliation with the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress,  is an excellent way to link reading and writing.  Students read a book, poem, or speech and write a letter to the author, living or dead, that expresses how that author’s work has influenced or changed their lives in a meaningful way.  Was their perspective of the world changed?  Or, perhaps did students develop a more personal understanding of themselves?

Whatever the impact of the work, when students write to authors, a shared bond is formed. There has been an exchange of ideas through creative expression, even if the author does not or cannot, respond.  The work of the author has already spoken to the student and elicited a response.   Writing to the author is a manifestation of that response and gives it life.  Isn’t this exactly how we hope our students will learn to write – persuasively, with emotion, logically, and for a purpose?

If you need to convince yourself that Letters About Literature is worth promoting on your campus just take a look at the TEKS.  I have included examples from the elementary, middle school, and high school TEKS below:

Elementary

(19)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:  (B)  write short letters that put ideas in a chronological or logical sequence and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing)

Middle

(17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (B)  write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;

High School

(16)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and includes reflections on decisions, actions, and/or consequences.

The contest makes letter writing interesting to students; however, you will need to tie it to your curriculum.  Included on the website is a Teaching Guide with lessons and activities for all three levels of the contest to help students write their letters.  Deadlines are approaching. 

  • Level 3 (grades 9-12) is due by December 4th.
  • Level 1 (grades 4-6) and Level 2 (grades 7-8) are due by Jan. 11, 2016.

Don’t delay.  Start a writing group in your library or co-teach with your classroom teachers.  You can’t go wrong when promoting the reading writing connection.

State winners at each level are recognized with their librarian at the TASL Business Meeting during Annual Conference – that’s in Houston this year!

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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#World Kindness Day: November 13

Monday's Musings

 World_kindness_day_globe November 13th is World Kindness Day! A global 24-hour celebration dedicated to paying-it-forward and focusing on the good.

Click the following site for easy ways to share the love.

https://randomactsofkindness.org/world-kindness-day

Imagine the possibilities!!!

Terry Roper

Terry Roper

Terry Roper, Library Consultant for Region 10 ESC. has been an educator/librarian in the North Texas area for 22 years. She has worked on elementary and high school campuses as well as central administration. Ms. Roper has experience dealing with English language learners of all levels and works closely with the Region 10 Literacy Team. Terry loves dealing with literacy and information dissemination and talking about book stuff!

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