Social Media Skills

Have you been left behind in the social media whirlwind?  Recently I attended a wonderful webinar by Cathy Hoesterey entitled “Sharpen Your Social Media Skills.”  She provided many compelling reasons to use social media, the most important of which is to create a personal learning network.  Be still my heart!  I always threatened, after I finished my terminal degree-the one that kills you, I would start on my second doctorate.  Only this time, I would be the committee, the chair, and design the course of study.  This social media thing allows just that to happen!  So here’s a list Ms. Hoesterey provided of people on the QIAT listserv who are also on social media:

Pinterest is a awesome way for all of us visual types to organize interesting resources. There are folks below who have gathered tons of useful AT resources.

 Check them out on Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook and Blogs

 QIAT FOLKS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Lorrie Corry- Pinterest (AT low tech, Literacy AAC, iPad ) http://pinterest.com/lcorry/

Carolann Cormier Pinterest 275 boards with over 18,000 pins on AT related items http://pinterest.com/cmcormier/

Glenda Anderson Pinterest http://pinterest.com/goodwitching/   50 Boards with over 5, 000 pins                              

Blog is: http://atclassroom.blogspot.com

Mike Marotta  Twitter @mmatp  

Mike Marrota and Kirk Behnke- Training for AT Professionals Twitter @ATBootcamp

Julie Johnson- Blog http://adaptedinnovation.blogspot.com

Resource Curator on Scoop.it! http://www.scoop.it/u/julie-ann-johnson

Alisa Brownlee- Twitter @alsassistivetec

Blog: http://alsassistivetechnology.blogspot.com/

Pinterest http://pinterest.com/alisabrownlee/

Facebook- The ALS Association Page https://www.facebook.com/alsassociation

Lynn Gustafson @lynngus80

Darla Ashton Pinterest http://pinterest.com/ATgirl/ (Boards for all things AT related)

Recommends Facebook sites: SmartappsforKids, the Appy Ladies, Appymall, and Technology in Education

Lauren S. Enders Pinterest http://pinterest.com/lasenders/ 135 Boards over 11,000 pins on AAC, iPad related boards, apps and more

Cathy Hoesterey Twitter @ATtips  Pinterest iPad for All http://pinterest.com/ipadforall

 

This should keep everyone busy for a while!

 

 By the way, that webinar is available in the ATIA Archives, http://www.atia.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=4381

FROM THE DID YOU KNOW DEPARTMENT

Region 10 has a subscription to the webinars, both live and recorded.  Yes!  From now till September 2013, you can attend these webinars for free!  You must contact me for the discount code.  Not many people have taken advantage of this so be the first on your block to get something free!  Email me at gayle.mcnurlen@region10.org

 

 

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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Council for Exceptional Children

 

2013Convention_525x175[1]

I had the privilege of attending the CEC 2013 Convention and Expo in San Antonio Texas April 3-6, 2013.  Wow!  It was overwhelming trying to select which events to attend from the thousands offered.  The program was 400 pages long so there was no shortage of offerings for any interest regarding the education of exceptional children.  I focused my time on assistive technology (naturally!) and on standards based teaching for our students with low incidence disabilities.

I’ll be blogging more about the events but I do want to mention the excellent presentation “AT Integration for Student Success in Math and Science.”  The presenters, Cynthia Feist and Tara Jeffs, from Loudoun County Public Schools, shared many useful resources and tips and tricks with technology you already own!  Their goal was to share low cost/no cost resources.  They have published 3 years worth of resource collection on their Edmodo site.  I will try to get their permission to publish the group code and share it here.  I also am going to look into having them present here in a webinar/lab situation. 

This presentation truly became a volcano for me – errupting with so many ideas and giving me inspiration for planning for next year!  Stay tuned…..

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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Something to Make You App-reciate the iPad

Seven of the best apps for education in 2013 is a link to an article from eschool news.  It covers Voice Dream Reader,  iSolveIt: MathScaled; iSolveIt: MathSquared, Grammar Wonderland, Virtual Human Body, ASCD for iPad, ClassDojo, and Thud! Presidents.  Some are free (always within budget), some were free, some are low cost, and at least one is actually a vehicle for professional development.  Remember this is just one groups opinion and ultimately you should use some systematic method to evaluate apps such as a rubric.  Here is a site to learn more about evaluating apps:  http://learninginhand.com/blog/ways-to-evaluate-educational-apps.html.

Take a look and let me know your favorite education apps!

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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Science for the Lifeskillz Studentz

Ok, I’m doing the “cutesy” spelling because I am inspired by a brand new product, Sciencewerkz.  This wonderful digital learning product was brought to my attention by Phil Neill (neillsales@sbcglobal.net).  The product is a line of interactive ebooks for tablets, such as iPad and
Android OS-based, as well as computers.  Each ebook includes interactive tools that allow students to explore relevant content as they are engaged to learn that content, test comprehension, and collaborate with others while learning science. 

Titles can be found in the areas of General Science, Life Science/Biology, Chemical Science/Chemistry, Earth Science, Life Science/Biology, and Physical Science.  Go to their website Sciencewerkz and download a free sample ebook and see for yourself how useful this long-awaited tool can be!  Under the For Schools menu, get the Nutrition in Humans ebook and have your studentz learning right away.

Let me know how you like this product.  Better yet, let the company know as they are expanding their line in response to feedback from people like you.

sciencewerkz

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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A Case for the iPad

 

GoNOW-both-AC[2]

Special education classrooms that utilize iPads for student use have many concerns!  A big concern is the protection of the investment from falls, throws, stomps, and other hazzards present.  Recently I was given a GoNow case for the iPad, a product available from Attainment Company, Inc. 

First of all carrying the item.  The nice handle allows easy carrying and hugging to the chest.  The case also includes lanyard loop holes so that a strap can be attached for students to have their hands free.  The case, a solid plastic metalic, has internal shock absorbing features to protect it from the bumps and drops. 

Secondly, and most important if the iPad is used as a communication device, there is a channel inside the GoNow case that redirects the iPad’s speaker audio to an external speaker grille on the front of the device. This allows the audio to be increased to a  level that is easy to hear, even in a noisier classroom setting.  No recharging or batteries required!

All the controls are readily available.  Installation is easily accomplished with a phillips head screwdriver.  While you are on the back, note the open hole so that the Apple logo is visible.  Having just finished reading the book Steve Jobs, I think he would have approved of that detail!

To learn more about the case, see http://www.attainmentcompany.com/gonow-case.  Region 10 will now have one of its’ check-out iPads in the GoNow Case.  Contact me directly if you want to check it out.

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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26% of Apps are Used Only Once

apps

That’s a frightening thought isn’t it?  I have loads and loads of apps on the 3 iPads that the Region has available for checkout.  I have a hard time remembering why I downloaded them and keeping up with them!  I have equal amounts on my phone and my personal iPad.  So what to do?  This is a post from 1/24/13 AT in the UP (a Michigan group) that is worthy of repeating.   Also take a look at the post on switch progression.  Outstanding!

There’s an app for that! But is it right for my student?

How many apps have you downloaded that you’ve only used once? An average of 26% of apps are only used once! With thousands of apps available for education alone, how can you sort through and find the right ones for your students? I just ran across this article that provides some great tips to help you decide if an app is appropriate before downloading or buying it. Besides the common sense tips like reading reviews and finding YouTube videos that show the app in action, here’s some other thoughts to consider:

  • Are additional in-app purchases necessary to make the app functional?
  • Do advertising messages pop up during use?
  • What privacy policies are connected to the app? Are you agreeing to share information with the developer?
  • Before updating an app, check if the update is useful. Some updates remove important features that you may have depended on. 

There’s plenty of sites that review apps and provide more on this topic. While writing this post I came across a Blog, Apps in Education, with a link to a Google doc that you can add to and re-share! It’s a collaborative guide to what apps do what. Many thanks to all that have contributed!
 What apps do what ??? Collaborative classroom guide  – – -> PLEASE ADD YOUR IDEAS AND RE-SHARE!!

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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iPad Apps: Cause and Effect

Recently on the QIAT Listserv (http://natri.uky.edu/assoc_projects/qiat/listserv.html) there has been discussion about cause effect apps for students. This particular response was very helpful and wanted to share it here. You are directed to a blog from a mom who documents the journey she took with her daughter as the iPad was introduced. The other reference is to a site with many cause-effect apps listed. Hope you find this useful!
From Laura Enders, posted 1/6/13: I have a large Pinterest board of apps that can be used for cause and effect activities. You can access the board at http://pinterest.com/lasenders/cause-and-effect-apps/. Best of luck!

Also, take a look at this wonderful post: http://techinspecialed.com/2012/12/02/applying-floortime-to-technology-how-my-child-with-autism-learned-to-use-the-ipad/. The child in the post is likely to be different from your daughter, but perhaps some of the ideas will help!

Lauren S. Enders, MA, CCC-SLP

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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The Assistive Technology Daily

This a post from Lynne Deese posted in RESNA PSG-07 Educators.

January 1st, 2012 marked the public launch of Assistive Technology Daily, a blog dedicated to sharing assistive technology solutions. As you will soon see, we share technology in a variety of categories that can be easily accessed by the user. New posts are available each weekday. We encourage you to share your thoughts about the technology featured here and perhaps to contribute some suggestions of your own.

Follow this Link: http://attraining.org/atdaily and Explore!

If you are unfamiliar with the features on this blog, take advantage of the instructional video below.

The Assistive Technology Daily | from the North Carolina Assistive Technology Program
attraining.org
Today marks the public launch of Assistive Technology Daily, a blog dedicated to sharing assistive technology solutions.

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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Tsunami of Assistive Technology

Do you belong to the QIAT Listserv?  This is a wonderful way to stay informed about what is happening worldwide in AT.  Get new ideas, have questions answered.  Here’s the link to subscribe:  http://natri.uky.edu/assoc_projects/qiat/listserv.html.

On 11/19/12  Jacquelyn Criger posted the following about feeling overwhelmed by staying current in AT.  I’m going to copy her message here and one of the replies in another posting.  How do you feel?  Are you able to stay on top of what is new, what works, where the field is going?  Leave a comment!

Originally Posted 11/19/12

Dear QIATers,

First, let me say…I love my job, the people I work with, and the children I work for.  But, today, as I weed through my (seemingly endless) email, I find myself wondering, “Is it just me?  Or has our field become truly overwhelming?”

I find it more and more difficult to think I’m staying up on AT possibilities.  Staff are finding pieces they ‘need’ and it’s falling to me to figure out if it really does what they think it does, how to use it and to help them get up and running, if indeed, it IS something that the student NEEDS.  (Ahhh, yes, back to need vs want…an ongoing discussion for all of us, I think.)  A current example is SmartBoard technology…on an iPad.  [And, if you have experience with this, I’d appreciate hearing about it…]

With the explosion of iDevice and Android apps, Accessible Instructional Materials options, and software, (not to mention AAC…) how are you staying confident that you’ve done due diligence and are making suggestions that really are the best match for each student?  Is there ever a time to say, “This will do what he/she needs.  Let’s start here.” And not look further at the other options?

Thanks for sharing.  I’m seriously thinking I need a ‘tune-up’…or an over-haul!  :)

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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Texas Assistive Technology Network

Have you checked out the TATN website lately? There are several new areas including the recorded webinars from the recent Top 10 Technology-related Issues in Special Education. There are other awesome resources available there! Check it out. http://www.texasat.net/

Gayle McNurlen

Gayle McNurlen

An occupational therapist by background, I have been dabbling in technology since the early days of the Macintosh. I got my dream job in 2003 as the assistive technology consultant at Region 10. I would much rather play with technology than do my real job so this seems to be a good fit for me! I am also the Low Incidence Disabilities consultant.

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